Petloss.com Logo. Puff and Midget under the rainbow

ALL the Pet Loss Message Boards are moderated to make this an ABSOLUTELY SAFE place for you to find support.
You must REGISTER before you can post or reply.
Posts and replies cannot be viewed until after they have been checked for content & released by the Board Moderators. - EdW
Pet Loss Grief Support Message Board
Sign up  |   |   |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 4      1   2   3   4   Next
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #1 
On 11/30, my sweet little girl was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma. Supposedly it's a common cancer in dogs, but I can't help wondering if she was misdiagnosed. I made the heart wrenching choice to have her put to sleep on 12/4. It all happened so fast. My mind still can't grasp the fact that she is gone. She was cremated on 12/10. The 13th anniversary of the day I adopted her. Can't stop thinking if there was something I could have done for her, or if it was something I did that gave her cancer. Has anyone had a dog pass away due to this horrible cancer?
jrinphx

Registered:
Posts: 1,345
 #2 

I am so sorry for your loss of you sweet girl.  Hemangiosarcoma took my heart dog Jackie.  I had never heard of this disease before but I have since talked with many people who lost their dogs to this aggressive, invasive disease.  You did not give her cancer, you did not cause this cancer.  I did a lot of research on this disease after Jackie died because I just could not understand how she could be fine in the morning and I had to let her go later that same afternoon.  Many dogs die even before diagnosis because it is that aggressive and there are often no signs that the dog is even sick until it is too late.  Life expectancy is very short even if it is caught, the tumors are removed and chemotherapy is done.  You did the best thing you could do for your girl - you let her go, surrounded by your love.

JoAnn - Jackie, Chan, Daphne, Scarlett, Noir and Stan's mom and mom to many other Bridge and earth babies   

Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #3 
JoAnn,
thank you so much for your reply. I was beginning to feel as though this was an uncommon cancer despite everything I had read about it being common.
I have researched it every day since finding out she had it almost a month ago. I can't help but think it is my fault, and that something I did or didn't do is the reason she got it. My feelings come in waves of sad to calm to angry and back again. It's been 3 weeks and two days since we let her go and not one minute goes by that I don't think of her. I am sure you can relate. Your words have helped ease my mind. I am so sorry for the loss of your heart dog Jackie. May our fur babies find peace and comfort at The Bridge.
yoda

Registered:
Posts: 346
 #4 
I had a female cat....she had a Mass...very large....she was always pear shaped and I said...well shes getting older too and her body mass is changing...muscles too...but she was unusually big around her abdomen.....2 vets examined her and the prognosis wasn't good....I said..OMG how could I miss this..I am a nurse!!!! I saw subtle changes in her behavior...yet I thought she was in dire need of a good tooth cleaning...hoping for the best and this was the cause of her being so picky with food I brought her in and all her bloodtests came back pretty normal...except her WBc count....I thought OK its an infection..but this MASS was hugh...and she was bleeding somewhere internally...cause they aspirated some of the fluid out of her abdomen....it went fast...the same as you ....I had to make a decision after she finally stopped eating when I brought her home on medications and getting antibiotics.....I prayed, I read the Bible..I lit candles I had a rosary drapped over my cats body while she slept..yet...the next day I brought her back and the owner vet examined her....not good....Smokey was not herself...I didn't know if she was in pain but after all those tests I had this deep feeling as to not put her through it all with chemo and such.....I decided to put her down...I was there....she meowed her last meow as the injection was given..I was a basket case......soon after that I had her cremated..IT all happened so fast I was in another world..I just couldn't think...NOW I am suffering...Now the pain is killing me everyday......MAYBE IF I DID that...Maybe if she would have had the surgery....maybe maybe maybe...there was a chance and I didn't do the right thing to save her life.......I cant handle it....I don't think we ever get over this,  Our pets are our lives.....I am alone...and it hurts so badly my mood is actually changing......I pray that you find your peace in your heart...>I cannot find mine yet....it will take a long long time for me to come to terms with.....its not easy at all.  God Bless.
sbf20112011

Registered:
Posts: 12
 #5 
I lost my sweet 15-year-old dog on 12/3, most likely to hemangiosarcoma (we didn't have it biopsied, but she had a large mass on her spleen that had ruptured, which makes hemangiosarcoma a very likely diagnosis). I am so sorry for your loss. Losing my dog was pretty much the most grief I have ever experienced. It has gotten better with time, though I am still sad about it. I hope we all feel much better with time.
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #6 
Yoda, I feel your pain. I do the same thing, wonder if there was something I could have done for her. Your Smokeys situation sounds almost identical to my dog Emma's. it is incredibly lonely without her. I still cant believe she is gone. I think it will take me a long time to recover from this loss as well. Hang in there, our babies are shining down on us now
jrinphx

Registered:
Posts: 1,345
 #7 
 I also lost my cat Noir to hemangiosarcoma a year and a half after losing Jackie to it.  Jackie was my heart - she was the only being who let me know every single day how much she loved me.  Losing her took me to a depth of grief I have never experienced before.  With humans there is baggage - arguments, things said that maybe shouldn't have been said, etc.  With our animal companions it is just pure love.   
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #8 
Yes, it is a different kind of love. The emotions that come with the loss of a pet can be overwhelming sometimes. And I know that other people think I'm crazy and I should be over this by now, but I don't think I will ever be over it. I always said that Emma was my soulmate and she truly was. I feel like an empty shell of a body. I just get up every day and go through the motions of daily life, but I'm not really happy anymore. She was my happiness.
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #9 
sbf2011,
That's the same form that my dog had. Hers had ruptured as well and I could actually see the blood under her skin on her belly. We didn't have it biopsied either. Yet another reason I worry it may have been a misdiagnosis. Did your dog show any signs/ symptoms leading up to it?
jrinphx

Registered:
Posts: 1,345
 #10 
Sweetmeli,

I saw your question to sbf20112011 and thought I would let you know that Jackie also had a large mass on her spleen (a very common site for hemangiosarcoma) which ruptured.  She was playing outside in the front yard in the morning and when she came in I noticed she was doing some abdominal breathing.  We had just changed her medication for Cushings disease and I thought maybe that was causing the change in the breathing so I took her into the vet.  They said she was a little dehydrated but nothing else out of the ordinary and they would keep her and give her some fluids.  A couple hours later they called and told me about the mass.  Her regular vet (also named Jackie) was not on duty but she came in to see what was going on.  She did some bloodwork and when she told me the results I knew she was bleeding internally.  Dr. Jackie started crying because my girl had various medical issues all of her life and spent quite a bit of time at the vets.  She loved all of the vet techs and most of all she loved Dr. Jackie and Dr. Jackie loved her.  I met with Dr. Jackie the next day because I needed to understand what took my girl.  She then told me about hemangiosarcoma and how quickly it can take over.  In a way I am glad it took her so fast because I know I would have had the surgery done and chemotherapy.  I know in my heart my girl had already gone through so much and she would have hated it and I would have been terrified to leave her for even a minute because she might die without me there.  She lived so fully every minute of every day and I was able to hold her in my arms as she spread her angel wings and flew off to her next adventure.

Sorry this is so long but she was my family, my adopted child, my heart (I am single and have no human children) and a lot of people cannot understand the devastation of the loss of a beloved animal companion. 
sbf20112011

Registered:
Posts: 12
 #11 
Sweetmeli,

My dog had no symptoms leading up to the rupture. She'd had a chronic cough that we were treating with prednisone, but it seemed like that was chronic bronchitis, chest rays hadn't shown anything that would be causing a cough.

I also sometimes feel guilty that we didn't do the surgery, and wonder whether it possibly could have been one of the rare benign masses. But when you look at the stats, a mass on the spleen that ruptures is almost always hemangiosarcoma.

I try to think of everything from my dog's point of view when I feel guilt. The thing that helps me through this is knowing that my dog had no idea what was going on, right up until the end. I might feel bad for myself that I possibly might have missed some extra time with my sweet girl, but she didn't have any regrets or fear of death, because she wouldn't have known what was happening.

I'm sorry, I know how hard this is. 
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #12 
Thank you for your responses. It helps me to remember that she was sick and I saved her from a terrible death.
sbf2011, I like your perspective on thinking of it from your dogs point of view. I guess for me I just harbor a lot of guilt. Wishing I had spent more time with her or that I caught this sooner. Emma started showing signs 2 weeks prior to me having to let her go, but I thought it was just age. I know things will get better in time, but it's so hard to believe she is gone.
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #13 
jrinphx, reading your post is like reading my own words. I have said the same thing before, that in some way I'm glad it wasn't something manageable because I would have done it, and Emma wouldn't have wanted that.
She was like my child also. We did everything together. After 13 years it's hard to be happy. And even though I am married with a 9 month old son, I still feel so alone. I cry every morning and every night. There is such a void in the house. I truly understand how you feel. I think that connecting with others on this site will help me start to heal and I hope it does for you as well. Thank you so much for sharing your story with me
Ltb3105

Registered:
Posts: 295
 #14 
OMG!  I just put my boxer mix, Ray, down yesterday.  It was a total and sudden shock to me.  I have written a long post about it.  He had the same cancer but we brought him in for arthritis almost a year ago (he was 7 then) and the vet put him on anti inflams and pain meds.  Vet did complete bloodwork, everything was fine.  Fast forward to after Christmas.  Ray collapsed while on a walk.  He managed to get up and we went home.  His legs were getting bad again.  NYE I took him in and they prescribed same meds.  He never was the same.  He vomited up the meds, lost his appetite and seemed very lethargic and depressed.  Called the vet and she said to stop the meds and see if his appetite comes back.  Nope.  So, yesterday, I bring him back in and they decided to finally do xrays on his back side and legs.  She comes back shaking her head.  He had a large mass on his spleen and the blood work they ran showed blood counts that were half of what they should be.  She said his paws were cold to the touch and when she looked inside his mouth she was appalled.  His gums were a pale gray.  She immediately called the animal hospital and I drove him there.  They did an ultrasound.  Doc came back and said it's bad.  He had tumors ALL THROUGHOUT HIS BODY besides the spleen!  Near his heart, on his lungs, in his liver.  No amount of surgery would have saved him, it had spread.  I went in thinking he had bad hips and arthritis and I left without my dog.  I had them put him down right there and then.

Drove home numb last night and then the dam burst.  Had a bad morning too and several anxiety attacks.  I get overwhelmed thinking I cannot go on without him!  I also have a son with Down's that does not understand where his buddy Ray Ray went.  Only 8 years old.  I feel he was cheated from a longer life.

Just wanted to share my story.  CANCER SUCKS!
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #15 
Ltb3105,
I completely understand what you're going through. It literally came out of nowhere. I just don't understand it. I'm sorry you have to go through this and so sorry for your loss. I agree, cancer really sucks!!
Tomorrow will be 5 weeks since I lost my girl and I still struggle to get through my days without her.
Ltb3105

Registered:
Posts: 295
 #16 
OMG I just looked up hemangiosarcoma and the prognosis is NOT GOOD all the way around.  Wow, just wow.  Very rapidly spreading aggressive form of cancer, very common in boxers.  By the time the animal begins to show symptoms, it is already too late.  There was NOTHING I could have done to save him.  His gums were pale, which was the first sign he was already losing blood in his spleen and had I taken him home, it would've ruptured.  He would have died a horrible, painful death.


I know now I did the right thing by putting him down right after the vet told me the diagnosis.  It doesn't make it any easier but I do feel a sense of closure and comfort knowing there was really nothing left to do.

Hoping this will give others some sense of comfort.  Cancer really is a sneaky and horrible disease.

Much love,
Laura


Keefcat

Registered:
Posts: 79
 #17 
I know this post is quite late. I hope you are doing well and the pain has decreased. I just had to tell you that I had to put my sweet boy Riley down this past Sunday. He was doing well on Saturday morning. Eating, no weight loss, but then he started arching his back and just kind of couldn't get comfortable, take him to the vet. She says she couldn't find anything. Maybe a pulled muscle. Gave him meds and off we went. Soooooo happy she didn't find anything. Fast forward to 6 the next morning and he couldn't stand without help. I figure it's the Tramadol they gave him. Maybe a bad reaction. Then he tried to stand and promptly fell over. Off to the vet. One hour later my boy was dead. From hemangiosarcoma. Completely burst and he was bleeding out.

My dog Hannah had the same thing in 2000.

When the vet told us he found free fluid in Riley, I knew what it was. My hubby started crying. This stupid cancer is all too freaking familiar.

Take care
Lauren
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #18 
keefcat,
I am so very sorry for your loss. It is a terrible cancer. I miss my Emma every day and still cry a little every day, but I am doing better. What breed were Riley and Hannah and what were their ages? I'm sorry you have gone through this twice. It's so unfair. And this cancer comes without any warning. My heart breaks for you. Riley, Hannah and Emma are at peace now.
Thank you for reaching out to me.
Keefcat

Registered:
Posts: 79
 #19 
Sweetmeli, so sorry for you and your loss of Emma. So shocking when this happens. Sitting in the vets office and thinking "What the heck is going on????" It's almost surreal.

Riley was a mix of Golden and black lab who looked like a flat coated retriever. He had just turned 9 in January. He had no signs except slowing down when getting up. I thought it was him getting older. But he must have been struggling with pain. But not a peep,out of him.

Hannah was a German Shepard mix. She was 12, but she had had a significant weight loss several months prior. The vet said we could do X-rays and I said no, what would we do if it were cancer. I was pretty cavalier. She was my first dog ( I got her in 1988), so I knew NOTHING about these terrible diseases. Had I known, I don't know what I would have done.

After reading about hemangiosarcoma I found that Riley had a double whammy with both golden and lab mix. German Shepard are prone too. Boxers get this a lot too. I had another dog, Zella, die in October of 2014 with lymphoma. That was out of the blue as well. To the vet with symptoms on Thursday, and put down on Saturday.

Funny thing and makes me cry as I write this. I told Riley last week how much I missed Zella. They were identical in appearance, but were no way related. They played so much and truly were best buds. And now my Riley is gone too. I hope they're having a great time!! Maybe they met up with Emma!

I had to research the heck out of dog cancers cause that's how I am. I found that 1 in 2 dogs will die from cancer, the most common being hemangiosarcoma and lymphoma.

I suppose that we should come to expect that that's how our babies will go. I hate that.

My golden sits beside me and I pray his 11-year-old body is okay....


I hope this helps. Write if you need to. I find this board very helpful and cathartic.

Lauren
bees_mom62205

Registered:
Posts: 8
 #20 
We lost our sweet girl to hemangiosarcoma this week.  It has really helped to read these postings, because I realize that I wasn't the only one to chalk behavior changes up to age/arthritis.  And she did have arthritis, and was almost 11 years old.  Having read everything I can get my hands on about this cancer, I realize that we were fighting a losing battle.  About seven weeks ago, we noticed "B" was a little off, not jumping on furniture, laying in new but not normal postures, and some diarrhea (sp).  We took her to the vet who did x-rays and noticed she was sensitive to touch on her back, but attributed it to the arthritis and gave her Rimadyl and something for the gastro symptoms.  When she did not improve after a week, we went back to the vet, who ran blood work and an ultra-sound.  She thought it was gall-bladder and said she "might" have seen something on the liver, but opted to treat for gallbladder disease.  During this time she was exhibiting what I now see is a familiar pattern - perk up one day, slow down the next.  Four weeks later she had a terrible attack, which I know now was a bleed from the spleen.  Back to the vet who said we had a very sick dog, and sent us to the veterinary teaching hospital two hours away.  After they examined her, they told us the worst - she had a large tumor on her spleen that had spread to the liver and lungs, and there was nothing we could do.  

I am feeling more confident we did the right thing, but can honestly say (and my husband agrees) this was the most painful thing we have experienced.  She was such a presence in our home, and it just isn't home without her.  

Peace and love to everyone who has lost a pet to this horrible disease.

Bees Mom
Brian1961

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #21 
I know how you feel. Lost my Molly girl to cancer. Had her spleen removed and after several blood transfusions started chemo. After that experience putting her to sleep would have been the more loving thing to do. I asked the same question, why does this happen? The vet, who I consider top notch explained it to me this way. Something in her DNA caused that one cell to mutate to be cancerous. Sometimes it can be environmental, sometimes an injury and sometimes it just happens. Watching her during chemo was heart breaking and was much worse than letting her go. I miss Molly, she was a wonderful dog and I hope one day they find the cure for cancer. I just suffered another loss and heart broken again. I am right there with you and willing to talk because I think we can all help eachother.
waspwarrior

Registered:
Posts: 115
 #22 
I just found out that this is very likely the same kind of Cancer that took Tyson from me & his family.  It too was located on the spleen.  It ruptured and he was likely too weak to survive the surgery to remove it (massive blood loss).  Even if the mass could have been removed they said his time would likely be 2 months if he was lucky.  His owners chose the most humane thing they could...they let him go before even waking from anesthesia.  So I know his passing was quick, painless, & as gentle as possible.  The vet even mentioned even if they brought him in last night (vet was already closed) the outcome would have likely been the same.


I am really having a tough time dealing with this.  Mainly because I hadn't seen him in a few weeks & I didn’t get a chance to say goodbye.  I didn't get to tell him how special he was to me /us (my husband too), how much we loved and adored him, to run my hands over his silken head & ears & gaze into those beautiful brown eyes.....even though he was not technically ours he was in our hearts.
 
I realize that Tyson was not my dog but, I helped raise him.  His parents at the time were woefully ignorant in raising a puppy.  I am not saying anything negative about them other than they were not quite prepared for the hurricane that came to be known as Tyson.  I not having a dog at the time was happy to help out it anyway I could.  I walked him all over town, trained him, let him out when family members were unable to get home in time to let him out.  Bought him Christmas gifts just like we did for our own dogs.Tyson became my “borrowed” dog and I his “Auntie” & my hubby his “Uncle”.  The bond I had with that dog was incredible.  I taught him boundaries (of his yard) and although he was almost turning himself inside out with joy would wait till I crossed the street to get to him. 

The only warning sign was the night before Tyson did not eat ALL of his supper.  Very unusual for him.  They figured if he wasn't ok by breakfast to the vet he would go.  In the AM he was lethargic and painful in his belly.  They rushed him right to the vet (less than 10 min away) but, it was all to no avail. 
 
I miss my little borrowed dog.  =-(  It’s just not fair.
 
Hugs & Healing to ALL,
WASPwarrior/JENN
 
Brian1961

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #23 
No it is not fair. Besides Molly, our little Batman a chihuahua with bat like ears had the same thing. He was only 5 or 6, heartbreaking as well.
Michelle80

Registered:
Posts: 7
 #24 
We just lost our 8yo dog, Reggie, to what was most likely this horrible cancer. He had a tumor on his spleen that ruptured and bled into his abdomen. He had the surgery but then died shortly after due to heart arrythmias. The vet suspected that bits of the disease had already spread to the heart tissues as well.

I had never even heard of hemangiosarcoma until just 4 days ago. A few weeks ago, I noticed some small changes in Reggie, but too, believed it to be him just getting a little older. Usually he was his normal self.

I miss him so much. A piece of me is forever gone with him. I am so sorry to others on here who have lost yours too to this cancer. 
Stvjjg

Registered:
Posts: 1
 #25 
I can relate. My family is in so much pain. Our sweet golden retriever Baille passed away July 16. She stopped having an appetite a couple of weeks ago and was having a harder time getting up so we took her to the vet. They thought it was arthritis and did X-rays that showed mild arthritis in all four legs. She started taking pain meds and we thought they were helping because one day she would be her playful self with a great appetite and then the next day she would go back to being lethargic and not eating. We took her back to the vet and had more blood tests done. They said her white blood cell count was a little high but everything else looked good. We started her on antibiotics and a stronger pain medicine. She truly looked like she was doing better so we decided to go on our vacation we had planned months before. We left her with the vet And left instructions that if she stopped eating again to call us and we would have someone pick her up and then come home early from vacation. They did call us and said she was doing fine but was going to give her liquid pain medicine. We came home and picked her up and she acted like she didn't recognize us. Came home and she just laid down and wouldn't get up. Her belly looked swollen and hard. Took her back to the vet and they did a sono and she had several large masses that had pushed her organs to the side and abdomen was full of blood. The vet thought her spleen had ruptured. She was 11 years old and the vet didn't think she would make it through surgery. We had to put her to sleep and we haven't stopped crying since. So much guilt that we were on vacation and she was alone. Guilt that we didn't know what was going on with her. My teen daughter had her since she five and her grief is inconsolable. I don't know if we will ever get through this. We loved her so much!
Michelle80

Registered:
Posts: 7
 #26 
Its a horrible thing and I am so sorry for your loss. It's unbearable at times. I feel guilt too - for not seeing the signs. It was hard - 95% of the time nothing was out of the norm. A month ago, he lost his appetite and seemed a little dizzy. We took him to the after hours vet clinic, and they suspected he just had allergies. I still can't believe he's gone.  
Sweetmeli

Registered:
Posts: 59
 #27 
Wow, thank you so much for all of your responses. I haven't been on the site in a few months. I find that reading others posts adds to my sadness, so I try not to visit too often. I am so grateful for all of your responses though. I have been doing better in the past few months, but lately feeling the grief coming back. I think of Emma every day, miss her every day and still feel like maybe there was something I could have done. I just don't know if this feeling will ever go away.

Thank you all, I truly appreciate each of your stories.
Brianthedoglover

Registered:
Posts: 36
 #28 
Our English Bulldog passed away from this vicious cancer at 7 years old . It's truly a vicious cancer.
choochoo

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #29 
Sorry for everyone's horrible losses.I too lost my 7yr old boxer just less than 2 weeks suddenly to most likely Hemangiosarcoma.I also felt guilty not seeing the little signs but as I see many here also didn't see as it is hard to tell with this cancer.it is easy to blame yourself but this cancer is just evil your dog is fine one minute then on the brink of death.my girl had a tumor rupture on her spleen had massive bleeding and died within 2 hrs of collapsing.i still cannot believe she is gone.I not even sure if it was Hemangiosarcoma as didn't do biopsy but it all likelihood it was.I read here it usually is cancer when it ruputures on spleen and bleeds out like that does anyone know if that's the case.it doesn't matter but would ease my mind if I knew it was that horrible cancer and my girl really had no,chance no matter what I would have done.it really is a tragic way to lose a loved pet so quickly I am so sorry we lost our loved pets to this evil cancer.
Keefcat

Registered:
Posts: 79
 #30 
To all who've lost a pet to this horrible disease...
The only thing that I can find positive is that all of our pets appeared to have had a minimal amount of pain associated with this cancer. They were "fine" one day with maybe just a bit of slowing down, poor appetite, a bit lethargic....and then they're gone. There's really no time to think about what has transpired, just guilt of not having noticed sooner.

But doesn't that mean that they were relatively happy and not in contracted pain, pretty much until the end? That's what happened to my two dogs. So the only thing I can take away is to liken it to a massive heart attack in people. The end is swift and final. And we're left questioning "what if I ________." But the results are the same. They're gone, we've loved them, and left devasted... But know that up until that very last few days, few weeks, they were not in horrific pain or suffering tremendously. I would rather my fur kid go this way than spiral a slow descent with a lot of pain and emotional suffering for the involved humans.

Just my thoughts.
maryellen1952

Registered:
Posts: 29
 #31 
My sweet Pekingese who has been dead for 6 months also died from hemangiosarcoma.  He was only 6 years old; very healthy and never had any problems.  He even had complete bloodwork done less than a year before and was normal.
He suddenly collapsed one day and I took him to the vet who said he was severely dehydrated and anemic.  He was in the vet hospital for a week and even had a blood transfusion.  Then the vet said x-rays showed an enlarged spleen so spleen removal was done.  He was home with me and progressing for the next 2 weeks and then suddenly he collapsed again and the vet said he was again severely anemic and needed another blood transfusion.  This was when I decided not to further his suffering.  Two weeks after his death I received the pathology report that it was indeed hemangiosarcoma and had spread throughout his body.  
At first I thought about ending my life as I didn't want to be without him.  I'm single and he was my baby.  But I decided to go on.  I am still trying to find another dog.  I think about him every day and still cry often esp. at night.  I will just take time to get through the grieving process as he left so suddenly without warning which is the worst part.
I did a lot of research and even with chemotherapy dogs with this insidious cancer usually only survive another 3 months because by the time it is discovered it has spread through the body.  I have had dogs all my life and this is the 13th dog I've lost and it doesn't get easier; in fact I thihk as you age it becomes more difficult to adjust to the loss.
Brianthedoglover

Registered:
Posts: 36
 #32 
Hi MaryEllen,
Yes our English Bulldog also passed from this terrible cancer at age 7. Same symptoms with every dog barely any until toward the end. It's a vicious cancer and I hope you are doing better as this cancer just gives no warning.
choochoo

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #33 
Sorry for everyone's horrible losses.I too lost my 7yr old boxer just less than 2 weeks suddenly to most likely Hemangiosarcoma.I also felt guilty not seeing the little signs but as I see many here also didn't see as it is hard to tell with this cancer.it is easy to blame yourself but this cancer is just evil your dog is fine one minute then on the brink of death.my girl had a tumor rupture on her spleen had massive bleeding and died within 2 hrs of collapsing.i still cannot believe she is gone.I not even sure if it was Hemangiosarcoma as didn't do biopsy but it all likelihood it was.I read here it usually is cancer when it ruputures on spleen and bleeds out like that does anyone know if that's the case.it doesn't matter but would ease my mind if I knew it was that horrible cancer and my girl really had no,chance no matter what I would have done.it really is a tragic way to lose a loved pet so quickly I am so sorry we lost our loved pets to this evil cancer.
jrinphx

Registered:
Posts: 1,345
 #34 
So many of us have lost our beloved animal companions to this disease.  My neighbor across the street just lost his dog to hemangiosarcoma.  My girl Jackie was outside playing in the morning and I had to let her go later that afternoon.  We cannot blame ourselves for not knowing they had this disease.  Even if we knew, we would have to decide if we were going to put them through massive surgery and chemotherapy only to lose them a short time later.  And very often the cancer has spread to other parts of their bodies.  We have to remember they lived each day filled with love and we loved them enough to let them go.  Jackie was an Australian Kelpie - very smart, talkative, silly, protective and loving.  She was my baby (I have no human children).  I miss her every day, even though she left this world 5 years ago.  I will miss her and all of my Bridge babies until we are all together again.  I love this Rumi quote -

Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes.  For those who love with their heart and soul there is no such thing as separation.

JoAnn - Jackie, Chan, Daphne, Scarlett, Noir and Stan's mom and mom to many other Bridge babies              
choochoo

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #35 
Since losing my girl I have read on this cancer and it much more common than I thought.Some breeds like my boxer are at high risk at getting it and for some reason vets don't seem to recognize it or even warn about dogs who are at risk.The golden retriever cancer rate is I believe 1 in 5 of getting this cancer.I wish I would have known but my vet didn't say anything about the possibility.It may not have mattered but still a good vet should tell if a certain breed is at risk.I do feel you still love with your heart and never lose that bond you share with your loved one but not having her around is still so hard.Losing a dog so sudden like this is really heartbreaking.
choochoo

Registered:
Posts: 82
 #36 
Since losing my girl I have read on this cancer and it much more common than I thought.Some breeds like my boxer are at high risk at getting it and for some reason vets don't seem to recognize it or even warn about dogs who are at risk.The golden retriever cancer rate is I believe 1 in 5 of getting this cancer.I wish I would have known but my vet didn't say anything about the possibility.It may not have mattered but still a good vet should tell if a certain breed is at risk.I do feel you still love with your heart and never lose that bond you share with your loved one but not having her around is still so hard.Losing a dog so sudden like this is really heartbreaking.
Brianthedoglover

Registered:
Posts: 36
 #37 
There should be pamphlet made and put in vet offices for all to have also there should be recommended scans done every few months. It's a very complicated cancer and people deserve to know the risks and symptoms. Much more progress needs to be made and they are making pretty good progress in several labs trying to create an early detection blood test. There is one thing that as pet owners you need to be aware of on blood tests and that is in virtually every case monocytes are high when red blood cells and platelets are fine. Watch out possibly for high levels of protein in the urine also can be an indicator of something wrong pertaining to hemangiosarcoma. For some strange reason the vets ignore the white blood cell count being high when that's an indicator of infection, cancer and others. But it's there job to find out what's going on and they frequently don't. They give you anti inflammatory pills and sometimes an allergy diagnosis and hope our best friends are fine with a quick fix. I have lost 2 of my best friends to this and they both were misdiagnosed initially. Remember every breed is at risk for hemangiosarcoma so always be aware of this brutal cancer. Boxers and Goldens are extremely prone to this and not at just an older age I have seen it in boxers at only 4 in several cases. Educate yourselves on this since vets rarely do.
maryellen1952

Registered:
Posts: 29
 #38 
Unfortunately many petowners cannot afford to do regular scans as they are very expensive.  Also it may affect certain breeds but is not limited to them.  My dog was a Pekingese which is not in the breed category.  He had complete bloodwork and body x-ray less than 1 year prior to his death and everything was within normal limits.  If you read the vet info about hemangiosarcoma it is very difficult to diagnosis even with tests.  So the reality is that most of us cannot afford to have monthly bloodwork done.  And if you've read the info even with expensive chemotherapy (costs thousands of dollars) the lifespan is increased less than 6 months; again not cost-effective for most of us.
JanineSnyderMI

Registered:
Posts: 16
 #39 
my gosh!  I am speechless reading all of these posts on hemangiosarcoma.  It has been a bad day here...i say bad because altho i lost my 14 yr old Bichon Daisy on 9/23/16, the pain and the weeping comes in suddenly, like a flood.  I also lost my precious Daisy to this horror.  She was never sick in the 14 yrs we had her...then she begins to display odd behaviors: completely stopped eating, vomited up the sips of water she tried to take in; she was wobbly when walking....also at times she appeared to not know where she was at.  So i called the vet the morning of 9/23/16 and received news about my baby that caused me to fall to my kitchen floor, bent over in deep pain.  The vet told me on the phone the "update" and that there really was only 2 choices that we could make for her: chemo/radiation and MAYBE she will live an extra 3 months....or Euthanasia.  

I am telling you since i lost my baby that same day, and i watched her and was with her when she took her last breath....i am destroyed.  I am so angry reading about all of you, here, who have lost your babies to this wicked disease.  I cannot stand it...i feel deep in my heart that there must be a way to prevent this even tho i am doubtful.  I am the kind of person who becomes obsessed with "having to find out WHY!!?"  My husband and I were up most of the following night..getting stirred up with trying to find out HOW, WHY and WHAT.  We would go from studying her medical report and then getting an idea...then our minds would gravitate to ask ourselves:  "This came on her so fast and i did not know my baby dog was sick (this is where the guilt came in for me), i HAVE TO FIND OUT WHAT KILLED MY BABY!  I needed to find something/someone to blame.  I guess that is the anger part of the grieving process...i don't know.  We started her on a medication for allergies that was pretty new in the pipeline (Apoquel) and the medicine was flying off the shelves like a "miracle" drug.  I did more research on the chemistry portion of how the medicine works and i was horrified.  Did Apoquel cause this horrible cancer and kill my baby? I don't know and i may never know.  It is just so hard for me to let this go.  

Thanks all for your words here!  
Janine (Daisy's Mom)
Brianthedoglover

Registered:
Posts: 36
 #40 
I have lost my last 2 dogs to hemangiosarcoma. It's the most hidden canine cancer there is. It's very silent until it's to late but there are things I will watch for in the future. When my girl passed away on July 1st we created a non profit for dog rescue and to raise funds for research and clinical trials. We have a new booster campaign going now(just started it yesterday and we are selling our dog rescue shirts and all funds are going to Modano lab in Minnesota. If you would like I can give you our website. But believe me I know the anger and stunned feeling you feel as I have been through it twice with this disease and it inspired me to make sure we find a cure and believe me it will happen. This disease is vicious and works so different from other cancers. I truly feel for you losing your baby. I will never stop until a cure Is found.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

If you can, please help support this Message Board with a donation: