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Ltb3105

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Posts: 296
 #1 
Hi all,

Maybe some of you remember me from around last year at this time, I posted on the boards about how sick Kirby, my then 13 yo huskymix was.  They found out it was his thyroid and arthritis and in a few weeks, he was as good as new.  Well, maybe used, since he WAS 13 at the time.

His back legs started to cave in again, so we checked his thyroid level thinking he needed an adjustment in his meds.  Sadly, no.  He takes walks with me every morning, but he cannot stand up for long unless he keeps walking.  It's like his back legs turn to jelly. 

When he eats, he takes a few bites, walks away to regain his footing and then resumes eating.  What is the hardest is that he has gotten so smart when I give him his meds, that he will now spit the pills out, or eat around the cheese, hotdog, lunchmeat, whatever.  The only surefire way I can give him his meds is by shoving them down his throat and waiting for him to swallow, as when I mix with food, later on I find pills scattered around the house!

When do I know it's *really* time?  It's not like I shouldn't know, I've put down four dogs before him, but we've had Kirby the longest out of any big dogs we've had.  If he makes it this summer, he'll turn 14!

Any words of wisdom how to make his days easier and how will I *know* when?  Any easier way to get those pills down his throat twice a day?  Even tried grinding them up without him seeing me and mixing in his food but he turns his nose up as though he can smell the meds through the food!

I hate having to force the pills down him, it's so traumatic for the both of us, and he hates when I do this, as do I.

Thanks for any help.

Laura
WooWooWoo

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Posts: 5,100
 #2 
Hi Laura,

My Gracie, a black lab mix, takes two fairly large pills a day.  The vet recommended the following to me, and it has really saved the day: 

I buy the big chunk size of colby or cheddar cheese and cut a chunk off that is big enough to totally push the entire pill inside, then I coat the outside with a dollop of peanut butter.   The peanut butter sticks to the roof of the mouth a bit, which keeps the pill and cheese in her mouth until she finally swallows it.   Sometimes I just completely coat the pill with a LOTof peanut butter and that works, too.


Good luck,

Melissa

Ltb3105

Registered:
Posts: 296
 #3 
Hi, thanks for your input!  I used to cut tiny pieces of hot dogs up, and push the pill inside it so that it's completely hidden from him.  Did the same thing with lunch meat if the slices are cut thick.  Somehow, he refuses this, or if he eats it, he somehow can spit the pill out.  The hotdog trick worked for months, don't know what's going on!

I will try the cheese and peanut butter route.  The thing is, he's always been a very finicky eater, and right now I am spoiling him by giving him people foods that I would never have given him before.  He used to be a straight dry food eater!

It's like us humans...when we don't feel good, we refuse to eat, lose our appetite or want "comfort foods".  Heck, if I have to buy hamburger meat and/or steak to get him to eat his meds, I'll do that too!

Laura
WooWooWoo

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
 #4 
Laura,

I have used steak before, too, and Gracie wolfed it down like you wouldn't believe.   Those pills usually have a pretty nasty taste, which is why my vet likes to use peanut butter.   He says most dogs love it.

Hugs,

Melissa


Ltb3105

Registered:
Posts: 296
 #5 
Thanks, Melissa, I do appreciate your input, but I wonder why no one else has responded, as many ppl have viewed it!

I realize a lot of us are going through different stages of the grieving process.  For me, I think I grieve the most BEFORE I put down my babies, as I see them suffer during their last moments.  I remember when my Dad passed away seven yrs. ago, when the nurse called to tell me he didn't have a pulse, I was almost relieved!  Weird, isn't it?  Because then I knew his suffering was over.  I had been going back and forth to the hospital, while trying to take care of my three sons at the same time, and I was physically and emotionally drained.

I did go through a period of guilt.  How could I be relieved when my loved one passed away?  I think this will be somewhat similar too, when we put Kirby down.  The only difference this time, is that he is the last pet, we usually had two or three dogs at one time, and the remaining pets would help me survive the grief.

I don't want another dog at this point, it is too painful.

Laura
Nancee

Registered:
Posts: 1,328
 #6 
I hope the cheese/peanut butter route works for you. It sounds like a great way to hide a pill.
I have a 15, almost 15 1/2 year old Siberian Husky. She was supposed to be gone 2 yrs. ago--was vomiting, walking unsteadily, etc. and labs revealed liver problems. Vet said a malignancy. I started giving her all sorts of natural conconctions and she started doing better. I hope mine makes it through the summer, too.
 Kirby sounds like he has radar when it comes to detecting a pill. They're too smart sometimes.
Ltb3105

Registered:
Posts: 296
 #7 
When Kirby was put on the Rimadyl, they checked kidney and liver functions last year.  They checked them again in Feb. of this year.

I got a sample "pill pocket" from the vet today with his refills, but I know darned well he will somehow still manage to spit the pills out.  So, unless any of these ideas work, it's back to throwing them down his throat, we both hate it but it's the only sure way I know he's swallowed them, and not find them scattered around the house later on.
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