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Becky57

Registered:
Posts: 657
 #1 
I lost my dog two months ago to a devastating autoimmune/aspirin nightmare.  Nowmy cat and I are at the univ. of illinois teaching hospita.  She is losingkidney function fast.  Thyey say she has autoimmune, fic, or congenital kidney failure.  They want to do biopsy--I am scared to do that I don't know what fic is--it kills instantly almost they say.  I am praying to god that it is infection but the doctor said probably not.  Please, pleasepray for PolLy.  Thank you

Becky57

Registered:
Posts: 657
 #2 

I messed up--it is fip--not fic. 

WooWooWoo

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
 #3 
Becky,

I am so, so sorry you are having to face another nightmare.

I am sending up prayers for Polly and you, asking that both of you find the strength to get through this illness.

Please keep us posted.

Hugs,
Melissa
Gruntsmomforever

Registered:
Posts: 699
 #4 
Dear Becky,

Prayers going out right this minute for you and little Polly.  My friend, please hang in there.  I'm so sorry this is happening, and hope that Polly will be OK.

Hugs,
Katharine, Grunt's Mom Forever
mccats9876

Registered:
Posts: 460
 #5 

Becky, I found this on the Cornell Feline Health Center Website.

My prayers are with you and Polly.

 

 

feline health center logo
Feline Infectious Peritonitis
PDF Version of Brochure

What is FIP?

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease of cats caused by certain strains of a virus called the feline coronavirus. Most strains of feline coronavirus are avirulent, which means that they do not cause disease, and are referred to as feline enteric coronavirus. Cats infected with a feline coronavirus generally do not show any symptoms during the initial viral infection, and an immune response occurs with the development of antiviral antibodies. In a small percent of infected cats (5 to 10 percent), either by a mutation of the virus or by an aberration of the immune response, the infection progresses into clinical FIP. The virus is then referred to as feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). With the assistance of the antibodies that are supposed to protect the cat, white blood cells are infected with virus, and these cells then transport the virus throughout the cat’s body. An intense inflammatory reaction occurs around vessels in the tissues where these infected cells locate, often in the abdomen, kidney, or brain. It is this interaction between the body’s own immune system and the virus that is responsible for the disease. Once a cat develops clinical FIP involving one or many systems of the cat’s body, the disease is progressive and is almost always fatal. The way clinical FIP develops as an immune-mediated disease is unique, unlike any other viral disease of animals or humans.

Is my cat at risk for developing FIP?

Any cat that carries any coronavirus is potentially at risk for developing FIP. However, cats with weak immune systems are most likely to develop the disease, including kittens, cats already infected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and geriatric cats. Most cats that develop FIP are under two years of age, but cats of any age may develop the disease.

FIP is not a highly contagious disease, since by the time the cat develops clinical disease only a small amount of virus is being shed. Feline coronavirus can be found in large quantities in the saliva and feces of cats during the acute infection, and to a lesser extent in recovered or carrier cats, so it can be transmitted through cat-to-cat contact and exposure to feces. The virus can also live in the environment for several weeks. The most common transmission of feline coronavirus occurs when infected female cats pass along the virus to their kittens, usually when the kittens are between five and eight weeks of age.

FIP is relatively uncommon in the general cat population. However, the disease rate is much higher in multiple-cat populations, such as some shelters and catteries. FIP has also been shown to be more common in certain breeds, but the research is still unclear as to whether these breeds are more susceptible because of their genetics or whether they are exposed to feline coronavirus more often because many of them come from catteries.

What are the symptoms of FIP?

Cats that have been initially exposed to the feline coronavirus usually show no obvious symptoms. Some cats may show mild upper respiratory symptoms such as sneezing, watery eyes, and nasal discharge. Other cats may experience a mild intestinal disease and show symptoms such as diarrhea. Only a small percentage of cats that are exposed to the feline coronavirus develop FIP—and this can occur weeks, months, or even years after initial exposure.

In cats that develop FIP, the symptoms can appear to be sudden since cats have an amazing ability to mask disease until they are in a crisis state. Once symptoms develop, often there is increasing severity over the course of several weeks, ending in death. Generally, these cats first develop nonspecific symptoms such as loss of appetite, weight loss, depression, rough hair coat, and fever.

There are two major forms of FIP, an effusive, or “wet” form, and a noneffusive, or “dry” form. Generally, cats will exhibit the signs of the noneffusive form FIP more slowly than the effusive form. Symptoms generally include chronic weight loss, depression, anemia, and a persistent fever that does not respond to antibiotic therapy.

The effusive form of FIP is characterized by an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, or less commonly in the chest. Early in the disease, the cat may exhibit similar symptoms to the dry form, including weight loss, fever, loss of appetite, and lethargy. The wet form of the disease often progresses rapidly, and the cat may quickly appear pot-bellied due to fluid accumulation in the abdomen. When the fluid accumulation becomes excessive, it may become difficult for the cat to breathe normally.

FIP can be difficult to diagnose because each cat can display different symptoms that are similar to those of many other diseases.

Can my cat be tested for FIP?

One of the most difficult aspects of FIP is that there is no simple diagnostic test. The ELISA, IFA, and virus-neutralization tests detect the presence of coronavirus antibodies in a cat, but these tests cannot differentiate between the various strains of feline coronavirus. A positive result means only that the cat has had a prior exposure to coronavirus, but not necessarily one that causes FIP.

The number that is reported from these tests is called an antibody titer. Low titers indicate a small amount of coronavirus antibodies, while high titers indicate much greater amounts of antibodies. A healthy cat with a high titer, however, is not necessarily more likely to develop FIP or be a carrier of an FIP–causing coronavirus than a cat with a low titer. A cat with a high titer is also not necessarily protected against developing FIP in the future.

Other tests have been developed that can detect parts of the virus itself. The immunoperoxidase test detects virus-infected cells in the tissue, but a biopsy of affected tissue is necessary for evaluation. Another antigen test uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect viral genetic material in tissue or body fluid. Although this test shows promise, PCR is presently only capable of detecting coronaviruses in general, not necessarily those that cause FIP.

To date, there is no way to screen healthy cats for the risk of developing FIP, and the only way to definitively diagnose FIP is by biopsy, or examination of tissues at autopsy. Generally, veterinarians may rely on a presumptive diagnosis, which can be made with a relatively high degree of confidence by evaluation of the cat’s history, presenting symptoms, examination of fluid if it is present, and the results of supporting laboratory tests including a positive coronavirus antibody titer.

Can FIP be treated?

Unfortunately, there is no known cure or effective treatment for FIP at this time. Some treatments may induce short-term remissions in a small percentage of cats; however, FIP is a fatal disease. Treatment is generally aimed at supportive care, such as good nursing care and nutrition, and alleviating the inflammatory response of the disease. Cats with FIP are often treated with corticosteroids, cytotoxic drugs, and antibiotics. Supportive care may also include fluid therapy, draining accumulated fluids, and blood transfusions.

Research is ongoing to find other immunosuppressive drugs that may slow down the progress of the disease. Attempts are also being made to find antiviral drugs that will prevent or slow down the replication of the virus. One promising approach currently being studied combines both an antiviral agent and an immune response modifier.

Can I protect my cat from getting FIP?

In multiple cat environments, keeping cats as healthy as possible and minimizing exposure to infectious agents decreases the likelihood of cats developing FIP. Litter boxes should be kept clean and located away from food and water dishes. Litter should be cleansed of feces daily, and the box should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected regularly. Newly acquired cats and any cats that are suspected of being infected should be separated from other cats. Preventing overcrowding, keeping cats current on vaccinations, and providing proper nutrition can also help decrease the occurrence of FIP in groups of cats.

There is only one licensed FIP vaccine available; however, this vaccine has minimal if any effectiveness in preventing FIP, and it is not generally recommended by the American Association of Feline Practitioners Feline Vaccine Advisory Panel. Primucell FIP, produced by Pfizer Animal Health, is a temperature-sensitive, modified-live virus vaccine that is given as an intranasal vaccine, and is licensed for use in cats at least 16 weeks of age. The vaccine appears to be safe, but the risks and benefits of vaccination should be weighed carefully. Cat owners should consult their veterinarian to help them decide if their cat should be vaccinated.

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For more information, visit our web site: http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc or call us at 607-253-3414.

MusicMagEditor

Registered:
Posts: 76
 #6 
I'm wishing you the best of luck and my thoughts and prayers are with you and your special friend Polly.

I'm loosing my Wizard kitty, they say, within a week of Renal (liver) failure.  So, I'm doing my best to enjoy each and every of the last moments together before I have to put him to sleep. 

So, spend time with your kitty, be sure to let her know how you love her and she will fight, cats do!  Hopefully it is something that can get better.

Best of Luck

Bob, Wizard's Dad.
Putty Tat (Found Fall 1985 - Passed July 1993)
Merlin  (Found Summer of 1996 - Killed By Dogs 8/1999)
Demon (Born Summer 1989 - Passed April 2nd, 2006)
Wizard (Born Fall of 1991 - I'll be loosing him in a week)
Loudpurring

Registered:
Posts: 774
 #7 
Hi Becky;
 
I also e-mailed your email you gave me. I hope you got my messages.
 
FIP is Feline Infectious Peritonitis. It is a non curable disease, but it is not an instant kill disease. The progress of it varies from type and pet. There is a dry form and a wet form. It is usually a slow illness. i have known cats that lived with it for 10 years. There is a test for it that is in the full blood panel done for cats at alot of hospitals. It shows a titer. Most cats will have a titer of 1:1600 or so. That just shows that at some point in their life they havve been exposed to it, or vaccinated for it. It does not show active infection. There is no test that I know of (pre mortum) that definately proves one way or another the cat has FIP. This is a very different disease from renal failure. I don't think that I know more than the vets and staff where your taking her, I just think there is some miscomunication going on and I would lie to help you if I can
kdclairmo

Registered:
Posts: 540
 #8 
Becky, oh my friend you do not need this right now, I am so very sorry. Please know that your beloved Polly and you are in my thoughts and prayers and I do hope that everything is ok.  Please take care and keep us updated on her progress and what you find out.

Hugs
Karen
Becky57

Registered:
Posts: 657
 #9 

Thank you--she is not going to make it unless a miracle occurs.  Not fip--kidney failure--no known cause--slight possibioity of nsaid given to her but illness symptoms showed up long beffore this.  Some of the doctors here believe it is connected to my dog's autoimmue death.  The entire staff is distressed because they havenotseeen anything like this This is ahuge university teaching hospital--Thank you again.  I am past devastated--tomorrow is my dog's two month to her death.  If my cat continues she won't live past tomorrow or the next day.

rena

Registered:
Posts: 174
 #10 
Becky,

  I'm so very sorry that you have to go through this with Polly being so sick only a very short time after losing Lib.  I know what it's like to lose 2 in 6 months' time but it just seems unfair that you're facing this crisis only 2 months after losing Lib.  I'm praying hard that Polly recovers.

Hugs,
Rena
coralie

Registered:
Posts: 21
 #11 
Dear Becky, I am so so sorry for you, serious illness after such great loss is so unfair. I think I know how you feel. I lost my beloved Muffin last August at nearly 21(just made it harder) but learned to love again a new kitten, Jazz. But 3 weeks ago he was diagnosed with an exceedingly rare and fatal renal disease, a protein losing glomerulonephritis. He's not even one yet. The University of Sydney is studying the renal biopsy because it's so unusual - I pray that the extra effort put in by the Uni of Illinois to sort out Polly's unusual illness might help Polly pull through. Jazz is supposed to die within 6 weeks to a year, we have started an experimental treatment suggested by Sydney renal specialist. It's not knowing that's the hardest. I have added Polly & you to my hourly prayers for Jazz. Much love from Adelaide, south Australia
katebock

Registered:
Posts: 686
 #12 
Oh Becky, my heart is breaking for you.  I just don't have any words.  This is simply devastating.  My thoughts and prayers are with you.

Kate (Gus' mom)

Gruntsmomforever

Registered:
Posts: 699
 #13 
Becky,

I'm sending up more prayers for you and your Polly.

Love,
Katharine
Loudpurring

Registered:
Posts: 774
 #14 

Sorry I screwed up: a titer of 1:400 is not considered anything as most cats have this. A titer of 1:1600 is high and then they have to evaluate all other things considered.

HelenY

Registered:
Posts: 1,415
 #15 
Becky-- Please know that I've been following this thread and have been saying prayers for you and your precious Polly.  It brings back memories of my last days with Teddy; it was so mentally & physically draining.  We try so hard to keep them in our lives longer yet thinking of their quality of life at the same time.  I know that eventually you will find peace with all of this, but the long journey getting there is the most difficult part.

     All my thoughts & prayers---Teddy's Mom


WooWooWoo

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
 #16 
Dear Becky,

HANG IN THERE for Polly, and STAY STRONG.  We are all praying for you and wishing you and Polly the best.  It sounds like she is in good hands at the University.  Keep us posted, dear.

Hugs,
Melissa
Les

Registered:
Posts: 282
 #17 
Becky,

I am thinking and praying for you and Polly. I know you have been through so much recently.

Louise
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